"Since Martin Luther King, Jr.'s death, several persons, especially those seeking data for an article or book, have asked me whether I knew in what way I was influencing his life. The answer is an unqualified 'No.' There is no way one can know the degree of influence one has upon another.” ~ Dr. Benjamin E. Mays, in Born to Rebel

Advisory Board

Susanne Baakmann

Susanne Baackmann

Susanne Baackmann received her Ph.D. in German Studies at the University of California at Berkeley in 1993. Currently, she is working on a book-length study about discourses of memory and commemoration in re-unified Germany, entitled Memories of War, Wars of Memory. Her current thoughts and publication plans revolve around authors such as Hans-Ulrich Treichel, Katharina Hacker, Rachel Seiffert, and Tanja Dückers (among others) with respect to a narrative constellation that captures the simultaneity of proximity and distance to historical trauma by engaging with a child perspective or a perspective shaped by hierarchies of gender, age, and belatedness.

Stephen Bishop

Stephen Bishop

Stephen Bishop received his PhD in French & Francophone Literature from University of Michigan. His area of specialization are African literature and culture and the intersection of law and literature, exemplified in his book, Legal Oppositional Narrative: A Case Study in Cameroon (2008). The book examines ways in which people contest the dominant legal and social order in Cameroon through reading and writing legal stories that ironically portray the inadequacies of current government policies. He worked previously as a lawyer on the Navajo Nation for a legal services corporation (DNA: People's Legal Services), primarily in the areas of government benefits, domestic violence, commercial fraud, Indian law, and family law. 

Kate Cartwright

Kate Cartwright

Kate Cartwright received her Ph.D. in Sociology from Emory University and a MA in English from Lehigh University. She is an Assistant Professor in the School of Public Administration and a Senior Fellow of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Center for Health Policy at UNM. Her research examines how structural factors and social determinants of health influence racial and ethnic health disparities in the United States. She volunteered with AmeriCorps as a legal advocate for immigrant youth in federal detention in El Paso, Texas. She is a former Mellon Graduate Teaching Fellow, where she spent a year in residence at Clark Atlanta University.

Kency Cornejo

Kency Cornejo

Kency Cornejo is Assistant Professor of Modern and Contemporary Latin American art in the department of Art and Art History. Her research and teaching interests center on the intersection between race, gender and coloniality and the resulting decolonial methodologies, visualities and gestures in art. Topics she explores include creative responses to femicide, immigration, prisons, captivity, transnationalism, gangs, and indigenous rights and epistemologies. She especially theorizes decolonial methodologies as manifested in performance art, conceptual art, installation, and new media in the Americas. Currently, she is working on her first book manuscript based on Visual Disobedience: The Geopolitics of Experimental Art in Central America, 1990-Present.

Tiffany Florvil

Dr. Tiffany N. Florvil

Dr. Tiffany N. Florvil is an Assistant Professor of 20th-Century European Women’s and Gender History. She specializes in the histories of post-1945 Germany and Europe, the African diaspora, gender and sexuality, emotions and social movements. She received her Ph.D. from the University of South Carolina in Modern European History and her M.A. from the University of Wisconsin-Madison in European Women’s and Gender History.  She has chapters appearing in two forthcoming volumes: Audre Lorde's International Legacy: Essays on Encounters, Creativity and Activism and Discoursing Gender, Culture, and Knowledge in Africa and the African Diaspora. She is currently working on her manuscript tentatively entitled Making a Movement: A History of Afro-Germans, Emotions, and Belonging.

Troy Lovata

Troy Lovata, Ph.D.

Troy Lovata, Ph.D. is an Associate Professor in the Honors College. He was trained as an Anthropologist and Archaeologist (Ph.D., M.A. The University of Texas) and much of his work has focused on non-textual forms of presentation, the social role of material culture, and cultural landscapes. Recent research and teaching includes: the examination of monuments and public displays from megaliths to public art to graffiti; the archaeology of trails and walking; the study of people and the sense of place in mountain landscapes; and mapping and interpreting culturally modified trees. He has led research projects in the US Rocky Mountains and Great Plains and Ecuador; and has led study abroad and research courses in Ecuador, China, Egypt, Kazakhstan, and Spain.

Kadeshia Matthews

Kadeshia L. Matthews

Kadeshia L. Matthews is an Assistant Professor of English and Africana Studies. She earned her B.A. in English from Rice University, where she was a Mellon Mays Fellow, and her Ph.D. in American Literature from Johns Hopkins University. She specializes in 20th century African American Literature and Culture, and has taught such courses as Intro to the Harlem Renaissance; Reading Rap; Rewriting Slavery; Anger, Voice and Violence in Black Women's Stories; and Writing the City. Her current research explores the interplay of violence and domesticity in constructions of black masculinity from the middle to late 20th century. She is a former MMUF fellow at the Rice University.

Anna Nogar

Anna M. Nogar

Anna M. Nogar is an Assistant Professor of Spanish, specializing in colonial Mexican literature and culture, and Mexican American literature and cultural studies. She is a graduate of the University of New Mexico ('00 B.S. Biochemistry, Spanish, Honors Program) and of The University of Texas at Austin (Ph.D. Hispanic Literature and Mexican American Studies). Her published work includes the edited volume Colonial Itineraries of Contemporary Mexico (2014, U of Arizona Press), as well as two forthcoming books: a monograph on Spanish nun María de Jesús de Ágreda [Sor María de Jesús de Ágreda in New Spain, 1627-2015] and an edited volume [Cambridge History of Mexican Literature]. She loves working with the UNM community, especially the wonderful students in the Department of Spanish and Portuguese.

Jennifer Rudgers

Dr. Jennifer Rudgers

Dr. Jennifer Rudgers (Associate Professor, Biology) studies plant-microbe symbioses with a focus on beneficial fungi. Recent work explores how changing climates will affect plant-microbe interactions, associated communities, and ecosystem processes. Throughout her research, she strives to tackle questions with both conceptual and applied significance. Advanced knowledge of the importance of mutualisms in both natural and managed ecosystems can help us to make better predictions about the ecological and evolutionary consequences of environmental change. She and her husband (Dr. Ken Whitney) moved to UNM in 2012 from Rice University, where they were on the faculty for 7 years and mentored MMUF undergraduates. She chairs the UNM Biology Honors thesis program and regularly publishes with undergraduate co-authors.

Rebecca Schreiber

Rebecca Schreiber

Rebecca Schreiber is an Associate Professor in the Department of American Studies. She received her Ph.D. at Yale University in American Studies. Her research focuses on issues of migration between the US and Mexico and considers relations to place, identity and dislocation through forms of visual culture. She is the author of Cold War Exiles in Mexico: U.S. Dissidents and the Culture of Critical Resistance (University of Minnesota Press, 2008). She is currently completely a book manuscript tentatively titled Migrant Lives and the Promise of Documentation (University of Minnesota Press, forthcoming) that analyzes how Mexican and Central American migrants have depicted themselves and their communities through documentary photography, film, video and audio projects since 2000.

Lindsay Smith

Lindsay Smith

Lindsay Smith is an Assistant Professor in Geography & Environmental Studies. After getting her PhD in medical anthropology at Harvard University, she was a postdoctoral fellow at the UCLA Center for Society and Genetics and a Fellow in Science and Human Culture at Northwestern University. Her interests lie at the intersection of transitional justice, trauma, and scientific meaning-making. Lindsay has made films and published in collaboration with human rights groups, including the documentary Aparición con Vida, detailing the use of DNA in the search for children kidnapped during the Argentine Dirty War. Her current research includes the Latin American Initiative to Identify the Disappeared (LIID), a multinational scientific collaboration to use large-scale DNA databanking to identify those killed and disappeared during dictatorship and armed conflict in Argentina, Guatemala, and Peru. She is a former MMUF fellow at the Rice University.

Andrew Sandoval-Strausz

Andrew Sandoval-Strausz

Andrew Sandoval-Strausz specializes in the social and cultural history of the nineteenth- and twentieth-century United States. His first book, Hotel: An American History (Yale University Press, 2007), won the American Historical Association-Pacific Coast Branch Book Award and was named a Best Book of 2007 by Library Journal. His book reviews and interviews have been featured in The New York Times, The Economist, Reason, City Journal, Columbia, etc. He has received the National Endowment for the Humanities Faculty Research Award, the American Historical Association-Pacific Coast Branch Book Award, the Mellon Postdoctoral Fellowship, and the Ignacio Martín-Baró Human Rights Essay Prize. He received his Ph.D. in History at the University of Chicago. 

Marygold Walsh-Dilley

Marygold Walsh-Dilley

Marygold Walsh-Dilley holds a Ph.D. in Development Sociology from Cornell University, as well as an M.S. in Applied Economics (Cornell University) and a B.A. in International and Comparative Policy Studies (Reed College). Her research focuses on rural development, food and agricultural systems, and indigenous politics, with a geographical focus in Andean Bolivia. She teaches courses on food and agriculture, indigenous peoples and politics, and social theory.

Myra Washington

Myra Washington

Myra Washington holds a Ph.D. in Communication from University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign. Her teaching and research interests are in critical media and cultural studies, rhetoric, and both Asian American and African American studies. Her work revolves around representations of race, mixed-race, gender, and sexuality within popular culture. Most recently her research has focused on non-White racially mixed people (specifically Blasians — Black + Asian).

Irene Vasquez

Irene Vásquez

Irene Vásquez received her Ph.D. in History from the University of California, Los Angeles. She serves as Director of Chicana and Chicano Studies. Irene Vásquez specializes in the intersectional histories and politics of Mexican-descent populations in the Americas. Her research and teaching interests include U.S. and transnational social and political movements. She co-authored a book on the Chicana and Chicano Movement titled, Making Aztlan: Ideology and Culture of the Chicana and Chicano Movement: Ideology, 1966-1977. She has written several essays in English and Spanish on the historic and contemporary relations between African Americans and Latin American descent peoples in the Americas. Irene Vásquez co-edited the The Borders In All of Us: New Approaches to Global Diasporic Societies, published by New World African Press. 


Advisory Board Ex Officio

  • Pam Agoyo, Director, American Indian Student Services
  • Scott Carreathers, Director African American Student Services
  • Rosa Cervantes, Director, El Centro de la Raza
  • Tim Gutierrez, Associate Vice President, Student Services
  • Kate Krause, MMUF co-coordinator, Deans of Honors College & University College
  • Lawrence Roybal, Director, Graduate Resource Center
  • Kiyoko Simmons, MMUF co-coordinator, Honors College